This 1988 Toro Greensmaster 3000 was converted into a homemade, towable firewood splitter, using the framework, engine, hydraulic system tank and pump, engine control panel, battery, tires, wheels and a 1.5 gallon recycled Briggs & Stratton fuel tank. The hydraulic cylinder was free from an old Cat bulldozer and the “I” beam was recycled from a construction site. Three hydraulic hoses were made locally for the cylinder and return from the pump. A hydraulic control valve was acquired from a local hardware store. The splitter-portion and hydraulic cylinder mounting brackets were made using recycled flat steel cut and welded together and the tow hitch was made from 2 inch by 2 inch square tubing and ¼-inch flat steel. Outside labor cost about $200, parts were about $150 and it took about 20 hours of in-house labor. Brad Twidwell, superintendent at the Cape Girardeau (Mo.) Country Club, conceived this great idea.

Recycled Hand Spiker

This 1980s Toro Sand Pro spiker attachment individual unit was modified by removing the frame and drilling holes and adding brackets on both sides so an old Jacobsen walk-behind greens mower solid front roller could be attached. Old parts from unused equipment were made into the removal “T” handle (with linchpin to hold it in place) for pulling and pushing the spiker. The spiker is pushed or pulled onto the turf on the solid roller and then the handle is flipped-over into the opposite direction to lower the spiker into the turf. Brad Twidwell, superintendent at the Cape Girardeau (Mo.) Country Club, conceived this great idea. It took about four hours of labor and about $45 in parts.

Terry Buchen, CGCS, MG, is president of Golf Agronomy International. He’s a 41-year, life member of the GCSAA. He can be reached at 757-561-7777 or terrybuchen@earthlink.net.